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Export Finance


  • Submitted on 03 December 2014

    Created on December 3, 2014
     

    Exporting Planes, Trucks, ContainersThe Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration works hard to help companies that are ready to export compete and succeed in global markets.

    We want to emphasize that it’s never too early for entrepreneurs to start thinking about exporting – determining financing needs, targeting markets, conducting research, etc.

    As we’ve worked with global startups, we’ve learned it can be difficult for entrepreneurs to connect to existing resources to help them go global. We realize that start-ups differ in their capabilities at various stages of the business development process, but want to help young businesses incorporate export plans into their business model as early as possible.

    One great way to get started is to be a part of ExporTech, which can help your company develop its export plan, then have it vetted by a panel of experts. More than 575 companies have participated in Exportech, with an average sales increase or retention of $770,000.

  • Submitted on 09 September 2014

    Created on September 9, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Kenneth R. Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando U.S. Export Assistance Center.

    With the United States continuing its focus on doing business in Africa, we are working to connect more U.S. companies with every opportunity available on the continent.

    From the recent U.S.-Africa Business Forum to the upcoming DISCOVER GLOBAL MARKETS: Sub-Saharan Africa event in Atlanta, the United States has made it a priority to support U.S. companies doing business in Africa.

    Register Now for DISCOVER: Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Submitted on 13 August 2014

    Created on August 13, 2014
     

    Discover Global Markets

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    The United States is putting full focus on doing business in Africa, following President Obama’s  U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit and the U.S.-Africa Business Forum. Business Forum co-hosts Bloomberg.org and the Department of Commerce project the event will catalyze $14 billion in new business deals.

    Even though the Forum is now behind us, there are still plenty of new opportunities available in Africa, and the International Trade Administration wants to help you find them.

    The new Doing Business in Africa portal is a one-stop shop for finding resources, seeing success stories, and learning about opportunities on the continent.

    The upcoming DISCOVER GLOBAL MARKETS: Sub-Saharan Africa event in Atlanta, Nov. 5-6, will bring together private and public sector experts to discuss:

  • Submitted on 20 May 2014

    Created on May 20, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Commerce.gov Blog

    Warehouse - ExportingAt the Department of Commerce and the Minority Business Development Agency we are dedicated to helping more minority-owned business leverage their competitive advantage and expand their business through exports. The most recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals how minority-owned firms employ nearly six million American workers and contribute one trillion dollars in annual economic output to the U.S. economy. This economic output includes significant exporting contributions. In fact, minority-owned firms are export leaders in 14 key industry sectors.

    To celebrate World Trade Month we are kicking off a blog series to highlight valuable resources and information for minority businesses looking at exporting for the first time and firms looking to expand their existing exporting efforts. 

    Here are six steps to start exporting:

    Complete an export readiness self-assessment: Find out if you have what it takes to market your products or services into the global marketplace. Provide answers to nine questions and receive advice on your exporting potential.

    Training and counseling: use online resources like webinars and training courses to learn the basics of exporting and increase your understanding of the exporting process. Access webinars and online courses from the International Trade Agency (ITA), U.S. Census Bureau Go Global Webinars, and the Small Business Administration (SBA).

  • Submitted on 16 May 2014

    Created on May 16, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Jonathan Rees is the Managing Director of Western Union Business Solutions in North America. Western Union Business Solutions is an International Trade Administration Strategic Partner.

    Monthly U.S. Goods and Services Exports - January 2009 - March 2014A healthy U.S. economy includes strong exports. In an age of ever-increasing global trade, these exports indicate the demand for U.S. products and services, particularly in countries with an expanding middle class.Since 2010, the government has committed to help U.S. businesses find buyers worldwide, win more contracts, and learn new ways to sell products and services overseas. This commitment highlights the importance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in propelling the American economy.

    However, after a sharp appreciation, over the last two years U.S. exports have been showing signs of hitting a plateau.

    The good news is this: U.S. exports have abundant room to grow. In fact, compared to other industrialized countries, there are signs that the United States is only beginning to tap into its export potential.

  • Submitted on 14 February 2014

    Created on February 14, 2014
     

    Global Connect: Arizona Trade Finance SeminarThis post originally appeared on International Trade Administration Tradeology blog.

    Yuki Fujiyama is a trade finance specialist with the Office of Finance and Insurance Industries in the International Trade Administration.

    The U.S. Department of Commerce is partnering with a number of local organizations and federal agencies in offering The Global Connect: Arizona Trade Finance Seminar at the Thunderbird School of Global Management on February 21 in Glendale, Ariz.

    This seminar will be available in person and via teleconference, covering a series of important export finance subjects:

    • How to get paid from export sales;

    • Ways to approach and work with banks to enter and grow in global markets;

    • Steps to access export working capital and trade credit;

    • How to increase export sales and reduce the risk of nonpayment by foreign buyers;

    • Methods of receiving payment in foreign currencies;

    • U.S. government export assistance resources; and

    • Global business development resources for minority-owned businesses.

    Global Connect: Arizona will bring together experts from both the public and private sectors to discuss resources available to U.S. exporters. This applies to businesses of any size for their financing needs.

  • Submitted on 24 January 2014

    Created on January 24, 2014
     

    National Export Initiative Connects Businesses with World Markets

    World Map and ChartsDid you know that according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, minority-owned firms are twice as likely to export as other U.S.-owned businesses? The data indicates that minority-owned firms are best positioned to succeed and expand in the growing global economy. With 95 percent of the world’s consumers outside of the United States, exporting enables businesses to boost their bottom line while building their international competitiveness. For many U.S. firms, international diversification has enabled them to weather changes in the economy much better than if they had been selling only in their backyard.

    That said, many more minority-owned firms could be exporting more. Many business owners that I meet don’t export, in part because they believe exporting is too burdensome, or they’re unaware of the various resources available to assist them. However, expanding your business through exporting is more viable today than ever before. If you have a good track record of selling in the United States, one of the most open and competitive markets in the world, you are likely a good candidate to make overseas sales.

    In 2010, President Obama launched the National Export Initiative (NEI),aimed at expanding federal government-wide efforts to assist exporters while supporting millions of U.S. jobs.  These efforts have helped contribute to record U.S. exports culminating in an all-time high of $2.2 trillion in 2012. As a result of the NEI, more and more businesses are taking advantage of key export tools and resources to expand their global market share.

  • Submitted on 10 July 2013

    Created on July 10, 2013
     

    Loan ApplicationMany small businesses think they are too small to compete in the world market. In fact, 97 percent of all exporters are small businesses. The U.S. Government has loans, insurance and grant programs to help you become an exporter or expand your exporting business. Here are four different types of financing programs:

    Export Development and Working Capital Financing

    Enables U.S. businesses to obtain loans that facilitate the export of goods or services by providing the liquidity needed to accept new business, grow international sales and compete more effectively in the international marketplace.

  • Submitted on 04 June 2013

    Created on June 4, 2013
     

    Trade Guide SpanishOn May 8, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration unveiled the first Spanish language version of the Trade Finance Guide: A Quick Reference for U.S. Exporters.

    The Guide is a simple and effective tool designed to help U.S. small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) learn the best ways to get paid from export sales. Now that the Guide is also available in Spanish, it can better help U.S.-based Hispanic and Latino companies compete in global markets.

    What is the Trade Finance Guide?

    The Trade Finance Guide covers 14 subject areas in easy-to-understand two-page chapters that are written in plain language. The Guide is:

    • A “60-minute” self-learning tool for new-to-export SMEs that wish to learn how to benefit from export sales.

    • A user-friendly tool for international credit, banking and trade finance professionals, as well as export counselors for client assistance.

    • A flexible educational tool for professionals teaching international business.

  • Submitted on 25 February 2013

    Created on February 25, 2013
     

    Export-Import Bank: Your Global Finance Partner

    As U.S. businesses seek to expand their global footprint in emerging markets, the demand for a dependable global financial partner is imperative.  The Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank of the United States is the official credit agency of the United States and offers solutions to U.S. companies to assist with demystifying international financing options.  Its mission is to assist in financing the export of U.S. goods and services to international markets. 

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