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From the Director


  • Submitted on 03 October 2012

    Created on October 3, 2012
     

    David Hinson, National Director

    I attended the 42nd Annual Meeting of the National Association of Investment Companies (NAIC) and came away with extraordinary news and a more optimistic outlook on the growth and expansion of the minority business community.  Today, NAIC released a quantitatively focused report that underscores the strong performance of minority and women-owned private equity firms.  These firms create new jobs and expand the U.S. economy by providing much needed capital to the nation’s minority- and women-owned businesses. 

    The report, referred to by its short name, Recognizing the Results, is formally titled The Financial Returns of NAIC Firms: Minority and Diverse Private Equity Managers and Funds Focused on the U.S. Emerging Domestic Markets.  Compiled by the highly respected accounting firm KPMG, Recognizing the Results demonstrates that NAIC members—27 minority and diverse private equity firms focused on the U.S. emerging domestic markets – have outperformed the overall private equity industry for the past 13 years.  These results capture a representative sample of the larger sector of diverse and minority private equity firms. 

  • Submitted on 20 September 2012

    Created on September 20, 2012
     

    David Hinson, National Director

    Over the past two decades, the world has been shifting into an innovation economy. Fortunately, as President Obama has said, “Nobody does innovation better than America.” It’s not just our first-rate colleges and universities, though they certainly are a big part of it. It’s the American workforce. According to the President,“Nobody has a greater diversity of talent and ingenuity. No one’s workers or entrepreneurs are more driven or more daring.”

    Talent, ingenuity, tenacity and a willingness to take risks. These are the same strengths I see as I travel around the country meeting with minority business owners; strengths that match up with the demands of today’s global economy.

    Why is innovation so important?  We know it’s the key driver of competitiveness, wage and job growth, and long- term economic growth. We also know that it was Federal government investments in research, education, and infrastructure that made our economy competitive in the past. It was government’s support that paved the way for private sector growth and laid the foundation for American global leadership.

  • Submitted on 22 August 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    I am sitting with Luciana Mello, an Afro-Brazilian entrepreneur whose consulting company, Prama Consulting, assists small and medium-sized businesses export from Brazil. One of her main lines of business is language translation services. As businesses continue to move to a global economy, there is a growing need for translation services.

    Most of Mello’s clients are Afro-Brazilian companies that export primarily within Latin America. When asked about exporting to the U.S., Luciana said “Most of my clients don't consider exporting to the United States because they feel that the market is too difficult to enter and too large, but if they could find a U.S. partner, they would be interested.”

  • Submitted on 01 August 2012

    Kimberly MarcusMrs. Kimberly Marcus has joined the senior leadership team of MBDA as Associate Director for Legislative, Education and Intergovernmental Affairs. In this role, Mrs. Marcus will serve as the principal advisor on legislative and intergovernmental issues. She will also oversee the Agency’s relationships with federal, state and local elected officials and its advocacy and outreach strategies.

    “Kimberly Marcus is well-suited for this position in light of her experience in corporate and community relations with a special emphasis on economic development and diversity. Her first-hand knowledge of the trials, tribulations and successes of being a business owner will also add to her effectiveness,” stated Hinson. “I am delighted Kimberly is going to share her talents with MBDA and look forward to her contributions.”

    Prior to this appointment, Mrs. Marcus was National African American Outreach Director for the Democratic National Committee (DNC) where she worked diligently within the African American community to emphasize the importance of the African American vote. Marcus has also worked for the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, serving as Executive Director of its Public Policy Institute’s Government Relations office; and for the NAACP as Director of Economic Development. Even when Mrs. Marcus worked in the private sector at Strategic Research Institute and Bank of America, she was a champion for minorities and employees.

  • Submitted on 29 June 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    When Muhammad Ali, the legendary world heavyweight boxing champion, was asked by reporters why he kept boasting about being the greatest in the ring, he used to say, “It isn’t bragging if you can back it up.”

    The MBDA FY2011 Annual Performance Report (APR) backs up what we’ve been saying about MBDA’s achievements under President Obama. In 2011, we registered the best performance in our 43-year history. It was our third record-breaking year in a row.

  • Submitted on 31 May 2012

    Today, I held a series of conference calls with MBDA staff and stakeholders to announce congressional approval of our proposal to realign our regional office structure.  This change will enhance the efficient delivery of funds and services to our mission critical programs—particularly, the MBDA Business Center grassroots network that interacts directly with minority business owners on a daily basis.

  • Submitted on 22 May 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    World Trade Month:  Promoting Products Made in the U.S. Abroad

    May, designated as World Trade Month, is marked by events across the country to promote U.S. trade relationships and provide resources to U.S. businesses looking to export their goods and services around the world. This year it has particular significance – the Obama Administration and the Commerce Department have made increasing exports and revitalizing America’s manufacturing sector among their top priorities. It makes good business sense to link the two. Both manufacturing and exporting play a role in strengthening our economy, creating jobs and opening up opportunities for minority-owned businesses.  

    In 2011, the United States hit an all-time record of $2.1 trillion in U.S. exports. More than half of that -- about $1.3 trillion – was manufactured goods. And manufacturing not only drives exports, it also spurs innovation. Last year, manufacturing was responsible for 70 percent of our private sector R&D and 90 percent of our patents, according to a newly released Commerce Department report.  The report also shows that manufacturing workers earn pay and benefits about 17 percent higher than other workers.

  • Submitted on 30 April 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    Greetings!

    The Obama Administration and the Department of Commerce are committed to creating a level playing field so that all American businesses have a fair shot at creating the jobs Americans need and exporting the goods and services the rest of the world demands.  At MBDA that commitment translates into giving minority entrepreneurs the tools and resources they need to succeed and opening up opportunities, often in areas where they have had limited success in the past. Winning federal contracts is a great example.

  • Submitted on 27 March 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    Greetings!

    In his State of the Union address, President Obama laid out a blueprint for constructing an economy built to last -- an economy built on American manufacturing, American energy, and American ingenuity. An economy that’s built on making things the rest of the world wants to buy and where, if you work hard, you can earn a decent living.

  • Submitted on 24 February 2012

    David Hinson, National Director Supporting the growth and global competitiveness of minority-owned businesses is a priority for the Department of Commerce and the Obama Administration.

    And we’re making good on that priority. Last year, the Department’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) registered the best annual performance in its 41-year history. It assisted minority-owned businesses in gaining access to nearly $4 billion in contracts and capital, supporting the creation of nearly 6,000 much-needed jobs. Over the last three years, our network of 39 MBDA Business Centers, has been largely responsible for generating $10 billion in contracts and capital while helping to create and save nearly 20,000 jobs.

    Today, the challenge for MBDA– like so many organizations across the federal government – is to figure out how we build on that record while becoming more efficient.  A number of bureaus right here within the Commerce Department are facing a similar challenge, which has led, for example, to consolidating or otherwise cutting several programs in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), restructuring some units within International Trade Administration (ITA) and shifting the Economic Development Administration’s (EDA) emphasis to regional innovation strategies. So how do we meet the President’s mandate to improve services to minority-owned businesses and entrepreneurs in an increasingly difficult budget environment?

 

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