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Innovation


  • Submitted on 10 December 2014

    Created on December 10, 2014
     

    Each year, the 11 federal agencies that provide funding via the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs hit the road for a National Conference. The goal? To get the word out about the programs and to meet the entrepreneurs who are driving U.S. innovation.

    Hats off to Texas in their starring role as host of the recent National SBIR/STTR Conference in Austin, which was a great success. Startups and other small businesses in Texas and nationwide are learning more every day about the programs—and they’re liking what they see. After all, the programs are the nation's largest source of early stage, high-risk R&D funding for small business.

  • Submitted on 25 November 2014

    Created on November 25, 2014
     

    Intellectual Property Webinar Series

    Helpful TipsThe Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will co-host a free webinar series to help business owners understand the intellectual property process, starting on Tuesday, December 9.

    To join the event:

    • To participate click here to join the webinar.

    • To join the audio, call-in toll number: 1-650-479-3208; Follow the instructions that you hear on the phone. Your Cisco Unified MeetingPlace meeting ID: 996 407 651

    Register today!

    This three-part webinar series will provide participants with insightful tips for success on getting a patent or registering a trademark or copyright. Tune in and get answers from USPTO and U.S. Copyright Office senior intellectual property experts Elizabeth Dougherty, Anthony Knight, Susan Anthony, Craig Morris, and Sylvester Simpkins. The information shared will help you protect and promote your intellectual property rights.

  • Submitted on 10 November 2014

    Created on November 10, 2014
     

    Inventors AssistanceEvery day, all across America, good ideas are converted into tangible inventions and products that solve problems large and small and lift our quality of life. Do you have a good idea yourself? Maybe you’ve even developed it into a proof of concept or prototype. The next step you should consider is how you can protect what you’ve created.

    Patents are issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). They give their owners the right to exclude others from making, selling, offering for sale, or importing an invention protected by the patent. While getting a patent is a complex undertaking, here are five steps and resources to get you started on the road to protecting your invention.

  • Submitted on 04 November 2014

    Created on November 4, 2014
     

    Fall National SBIR/STTR Conference

  • Submitted on 06 August 2014

    Created on August 6, 2014
     

    Register NowThe Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will co-host the second of three complementary three part webinar series to help business owners understand the intellectual property process, starting on Wednesday, August 12.

    This webinar series will teach attendees how to electronically file a copyright, patent, and trademark application. Join us as we provide minority business owners and innovators with a wealth of information, resources, and tools to protect and promote their intellectual property. Get answers from USPTO and Copyright Office intellectual property experts Sylvester Simpkins, Craig Morris, and Jeffrey Wong.

    While there is no cost for the next USPTO-MBDA webinar, virtual space is limited, so you’ll want to register as soon as you can.

  • Submitted on 05 August 2014

    Created on August 5, 2014
     

    Originally posted on the SBA.gov Blog

    InnovateSmall businesses are the key to advancing America’s economy by bringing cutting-edge, high-impact technologies to the marketplace that improve health care, strengthen our military and protect the environment. However, small businesses often have difficulty competing with larger technology companies due to lack of capital for research and development (R&D) work that is critical for moving products from the planning to deployment stages. 

    To help entrepreneurs successfully commercialize their products and services, the federal government established the Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer program, commonly known as SBIR. Eleven federal agencies including the departments of Health and Human Services, Defense and Energy participate in SBIR, which provide small businesses competitive funding for projects that meet government research needs and boost technological innovation in the public and private sectors. The Small Business Administration doesn’t directly administer the SBIR funding awards, but it oversees and manages the SBIR program by coordinating with other agencies, reviewing progress and reporting to Congress.

  • Submitted on 25 April 2014

    Created on April 25, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on International Trade Administration Tradeology blog.

    Ken Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando Export Assistance Center.

    You spent the time and money to build your business, including the development of products and services (patents, trade secrets and copyrights), business methods (trade secrets), brands (trademarks and service marks), and your presence on the Internet (trademarks and associated domain names, copyrights). Why wouldn’t you protect these Intellectual Property (IP) assets from unauthorized use?

    Stopfakes.gov is your portal to resources for protecting intellectual property.Many small businesses are at a disadvantage in not having the expertise or resources to prevent theft of their intellectual property in the global marketplace. So in recognition of World IP Day on April 26, here are some simple, practical measures that any exporter can take to protect their IP assets:

  • Submitted on 17 April 2014

    Created on April 17, 2014
     

    Intellectual PropertyDuring the month of April, MBDA will collaborate with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to conduct a three part webinar series on the intellectual property process.

    The webinar series will focus on the three types of intellectual property protection: copyrights, patents, and trademarks. The complimentary webinars will provide a wealth of information, resources, and tools to protect and promote your intellectual property.

    Register today to learn from USPTO intellectual property experts on best practices, common pitfalls and where to start!   

    April 22 - Copyrights: An introduction to copyrights, how copyrights are protected in the U.S. and abroad, and the benefits of U.S. registration.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kc4Q

    April 23 - Patents: The facts about patents, including the differences between provisional and non-provisional applications and tips on making the application process more efficient.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kcgA

    April 24 - Trademarks: Understand the critical factors when choosing a trademark, the importance of doing a complete search, and whether an attorney should be used.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kcgT

  • Submitted on 14 February 2013

    Created on February 14, 2013
     

  • Submitted on 27 September 2012

    Created on September 27, 2012
     

    A discipline of experimentationWhat’s Level 1A? At Level 1, there is a single innovative idea. It improves or expands the existing business and measuring its success is no different from measuring the performance of the existing business. Also, there is no need to hire new kinds of experts or to substantially change job descriptions or core business process. At Level 1A, innovations can be implemented in a short time period — at most, a few months.

    Innovation Principles: The most fundamental innovation discipline is one of learning quickly from experiments. That is easiest when feedback is rapid and the innovation makes only limited departures from the existing business. The most prepared innovators identify the specific performance measures that are likely to be affected by the innovation, understand how those changes will impact profitability, and are ready to react quickly should the experiment produce disappointing results.

    The discipline of innovation is first and foremost a discipline of experimentation. Innovation projects have uncertain outcomes. Many managers, by training, abhor uncertainty. They endeavor to eliminate as much of it as possible. The more accurate the forecasts, the better the decision-making, the thinking goes.

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