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Innovation


  • Submitted on 06 August 2014

    Created on August 6, 2014
     

    Register NowThe Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will co-host the second of three complementary three part webinar series to help business owners understand the intellectual property process, starting on Wednesday, August 12.

    This webinar series will teach attendees how to electronically file a copyright, patent, and trademark application. Join us as we provide minority business owners and innovators with a wealth of information, resources, and tools to protect and promote their intellectual property. Get answers from USPTO and Copyright Office intellectual property experts Sylvester Simpkins, Craig Morris, and Jeffrey Wong.

    While there is no cost for the next USPTO-MBDA webinar, virtual space is limited, so you’ll want to register as soon as you can.

  • Submitted on 05 August 2014

    Created on August 5, 2014
     

    Originally posted on the SBA.gov Blog

    InnovateSmall businesses are the key to advancing America’s economy by bringing cutting-edge, high-impact technologies to the marketplace that improve health care, strengthen our military and protect the environment. However, small businesses often have difficulty competing with larger technology companies due to lack of capital for research and development (R&D) work that is critical for moving products from the planning to deployment stages. 

    To help entrepreneurs successfully commercialize their products and services, the federal government established the Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer program, commonly known as SBIR. Eleven federal agencies including the departments of Health and Human Services, Defense and Energy participate in SBIR, which provide small businesses competitive funding for projects that meet government research needs and boost technological innovation in the public and private sectors. The Small Business Administration doesn’t directly administer the SBIR funding awards, but it oversees and manages the SBIR program by coordinating with other agencies, reviewing progress and reporting to Congress.

  • Submitted on 25 April 2014

    Created on April 25, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on International Trade Administration Tradeology blog.

    Ken Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando Export Assistance Center.

    You spent the time and money to build your business, including the development of products and services (patents, trade secrets and copyrights), business methods (trade secrets), brands (trademarks and service marks), and your presence on the Internet (trademarks and associated domain names, copyrights). Why wouldn’t you protect these Intellectual Property (IP) assets from unauthorized use?

    Stopfakes.gov is your portal to resources for protecting intellectual property.Many small businesses are at a disadvantage in not having the expertise or resources to prevent theft of their intellectual property in the global marketplace. So in recognition of World IP Day on April 26, here are some simple, practical measures that any exporter can take to protect their IP assets:

  • Submitted on 17 April 2014

    Created on April 17, 2014
     

    Intellectual PropertyDuring the month of April, MBDA will collaborate with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to conduct a three part webinar series on the intellectual property process.

    The webinar series will focus on the three types of intellectual property protection: copyrights, patents, and trademarks. The complimentary webinars will provide a wealth of information, resources, and tools to protect and promote your intellectual property.

    Register today to learn from USPTO intellectual property experts on best practices, common pitfalls and where to start!   

    April 22 - Copyrights: An introduction to copyrights, how copyrights are protected in the U.S. and abroad, and the benefits of U.S. registration.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kc4Q

    April 23 - Patents: The facts about patents, including the differences between provisional and non-provisional applications and tips on making the application process more efficient.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kcgA

    April 24 - Trademarks: Understand the critical factors when choosing a trademark, the importance of doing a complete search, and whether an attorney should be used.
    Register at http://go.usa.gov/kcgT

  • Submitted on 14 February 2013

    Created on February 14, 2013
     

  • Submitted on 27 September 2012

    Created on September 27, 2012
     

    A discipline of experimentationWhat’s Level 1A? At Level 1, there is a single innovative idea. It improves or expands the existing business and measuring its success is no different from measuring the performance of the existing business. Also, there is no need to hire new kinds of experts or to substantially change job descriptions or core business process. At Level 1A, innovations can be implemented in a short time period — at most, a few months.

    Innovation Principles: The most fundamental innovation discipline is one of learning quickly from experiments. That is easiest when feedback is rapid and the innovation makes only limited departures from the existing business. The most prepared innovators identify the specific performance measures that are likely to be affected by the innovation, understand how those changes will impact profitability, and are ready to react quickly should the experiment produce disappointing results.

    The discipline of innovation is first and foremost a discipline of experimentation. Innovation projects have uncertain outcomes. Many managers, by training, abhor uncertainty. They endeavor to eliminate as much of it as possible. The more accurate the forecasts, the better the decision-making, the thinking goes.

  • Submitted on 18 September 2012

    Created on September 18, 2012
     

    InnovationWhy Innovate? How?

    All companies, whether small or large, whether new or established, must innovate. In fact, all companies eventually reach a crisis where the options are stark and simple. You can innovate, or you can die.

    Many companies, even the largest, stumble when they reach that crossroads. In fact, the average life expectancy of a Fortune 500 company is less than that of a human being. As Ray Stata, Chairman of semiconductor giant Analog Devices Incorporated (ADI) once said: “Every business has a life, and you always need to be looking beyond that life. The job of the CEO is to sense [the end of life] and respond, and to be an encouraging sponsor for those who see the future.” In other words, the only way to turn a thriving enterprise into an enduring institution is to strike a healthy balance between innovation and business-as-usual.

    A high-stakes innovation challenge could arrive at any moment. Your own crossroads could be months away or it could be decades away. To wait for it to arrive is to wait too long. The day to start building your company’s innovation muscles is today.

  • Submitted on 12 September 2012

    Created on September 12, 2012
     

    New SkillsJust a couple of years after they launched their new business, Mukund Kavia and Kusum Kavia could see the end coming.

    Combustion Associates, Incorporated (CAI), a minority business enterprise, had opened its doors as an engineering consulting firm in Southern California in 1989. Their timing could not have been better. California Air Quality Management Districts had just passed more demanding air quality regulations. Commercial boilers of a certain size — those used to provide heat and hot water in schools, hospitals, and hotels, for example — needed to be upgraded to meet the new standards. The managers of such operations did not typically employ experts on boiler emissions. They needed help. They needed someone like Mr. Kavia.

    As a result of its fortuitous timing, CAI got off to a fast start. Mr. Kavia was a Kenyan of Indian descent, and he had been educated in the United States and the United Kingdom in the field of mechanical engineering. In starting CAI, he had found a satisfying way to put his skills to work and to earn a living as an entrepreneur.

  • Submitted on 07 September 2012

    Created on September 7, 2012
     

    The Sophiscticated InnovatorThere are dozens of ways to increase profits. You can cut costs, you can negotiate more aggressively, you can raise price. Perhaps, however, you want profits plus something more profound.

    Try innovation.

    Some companies excel at today’s business. Those companies keep the wheels of the economy turning. Other companies innovate. These are the companies that build a better economy for tomorrow and raise living standards for all.

    The largest companies have mammoth resources at their disposal for innovation. And so it is, and so it should be, that the most storied innovators are always the underdogs — those working in the garage.

    Your garage may be lonely, but you do not work alone. America stands behind its minority business enterprises and salutes its innovators. In particular, America honors its enterprising leaders of this generation and of generations past for their historic and continuing contribution to the America we take pride in today. To sustain its greatness, America must continue to foster innovation domestically, attract the most talented and energetic business leaders from around the world and put their skills to work in this nation.

  • Submitted on 19 April 2012

    IP Awareness AssessmentThe U.S. Department of Commerce’s Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) unveiled a new web-based intellectual property (IP) Awareness Assessment Tool designed to help manufacturers, businesses, entrepreneurs and independent inventors easily assess their knowledge of intellectual property (IP). 

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