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Export Basics


  • Submitted on 14 May 2014

    Created on May 14, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    NEI NextSecretary Penny Pritzker announced NEI/NEXT – a data-based, customer service-driven initiative to ensure that more American businesses can fully capitalize on markets that are opening up around the world. Through five core objectives, NEI/NEXT will build on Administration-wide achievements under the National Export Initiative (NEI), to help all businesses reach the 95 percent of consumers who live outside the United States.

    Under the NEI, the United States has had four straight record-breaking years of exports – hitting an all-time high of $2.3 trillion dollars last year – up $700 billion from 2009. The NEI has been instrumental in strengthening high-level commercial advocacy on behalf of U.S. companies, increasing small business participation in trade events, partnering with regions to develop export plans, expanding strategic partnerships to promote exports,  implementing our trade agreements, enforcing U.S. trade rights, and driving the most ambitious trade agenda in a generation.

    In a new economic report released today by the Department of Commerce, data shows that nearly one-third of the country’s economic growth since mid-2009 has been driven by exports. Nearly 30,000 businesses have started exporting for the first time. And most importantly, since 2009, the number of jobs supported by exports has grown by 1.6 million to more than 11.3 million – the highest in 20 years.

  • Submitted on 05 May 2014

     

    Created on May 5, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on International Trade Administration Tradeology blog.

    World Trade MonthHappy World Trade Month!

    For years, May has been the time to not only recognize the benefits of international trade, but also for organizations around the country to support more American companies competing overseas.

    For the United States, the benefits of trade have been great, as have our successes. We recently announced that for the fourth straight year, the United States set a record for annual exports in 2013, at $2.3 trillion. That is a 40 percent growth in total exports since 2009.

    Behind those exports are millions of well-paying American jobs – a record 11.3 million jobs to be exact. That number is an increase of 1.6 million from 2009.

    As more American businesses compete and succeed in the global marketplace, the entire national economy reaps benefit.

    Around the country, state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, and private sector entities are supporting events to help more American companies engage in the global marketplace. We tip our hat to every organization throughout the country that is supporting world trade events this month and all year long.

  • Submitted on 25 April 2014

    Created on April 25, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on International Trade Administration Tradeology blog.

    Diana Alvarez recently completed an internship in the International Trade Administration’s Office of South America.

    Look South Logo with CountriesThe Look South campaign is encouraging companies to seek export opportunities in Latin America.

    More than 40 percent of current U.S. exports go to Mexico, Central America, and South America. Both its geographic proximity and the presence of 11 free trade agreements in the region make these markets attractive for U.S. businesses.

    As the U.S. government continues to support businesses expanding in Latin America through the Look South Initiative, one key aspect being addresses is working through potential barriers to trade.

    Issues like long customs-clearance times, inconsistent interpretation of customs regulations, and subjectivity of customs inspectors can add to the time and cost of the exporting process. These costs can especially affect small business exporters.

    To address these problems, the International Trade Administration is working alongside U.S. Customs and Border Protection, governments across Latin America, and other public and private sector partners on the Customs Modernization and Border Management Reform Program.

    This program brings business and government together to discuss the challenges faced at the border and to develop solutions that will make clearing customs easier, faster, and more efficient.

  • Submitted on 24 February 2014

    Created on February 24, 2014
     

    Western HemisphereAre you a minority business enterprise? Look south for your next customer! Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker announced the Look South initiative in January. The initiative is a U.S. Commerce Department-led, federal effort to encourage entrepreneurs like you to do business with our Free Trade Agreement (FTA) partners in Latin America. The 11 FTA economies are Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and Peru.

    Minority business enterprises have great opportunities in looking south for their next customer, since MBEs are more likely than non-minority-owned firms to export, five times more likely to conduct business in languages other than English, and typically possess cultural knowledge and business acumen that enables breaking into the global market more efficiently and effectively.

    That is why the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), in collaboration with the International Trade Administration (ITA) and other federal agencies, are working to encourage greater export activity among the nation’s 5.8 million minority-owned and managed firms. Through nationwide MBDA Business Centers and ITA’s U.S. Export Assistance Centers, minority-owned firms have access to financing, market analysis, technical assistance and other services to help expand their reach.

  • Submitted on 24 January 2014

    Created on January 24, 2014
     

    National Export Initiative Connects Businesses with World Markets

    World Map and ChartsDid you know that according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, minority-owned firms are twice as likely to export as other U.S.-owned businesses? The data indicates that minority-owned firms are best positioned to succeed and expand in the growing global economy. With 95 percent of the world’s consumers outside of the United States, exporting enables businesses to boost their bottom line while building their international competitiveness. For many U.S. firms, international diversification has enabled them to weather changes in the economy much better than if they had been selling only in their backyard.

    That said, many more minority-owned firms could be exporting more. Many business owners that I meet don’t export, in part because they believe exporting is too burdensome, or they’re unaware of the various resources available to assist them. However, expanding your business through exporting is more viable today than ever before. If you have a good track record of selling in the United States, one of the most open and competitive markets in the world, you are likely a good candidate to make overseas sales.

    In 2010, President Obama launched the National Export Initiative (NEI),aimed at expanding federal government-wide efforts to assist exporters while supporting millions of U.S. jobs.  These efforts have helped contribute to record U.S. exports culminating in an all-time high of $2.2 trillion in 2012. As a result of the NEI, more and more businesses are taking advantage of key export tools and resources to expand their global market share.

  • Submitted on 06 September 2013

    Created on September 6, 2013
     

    There are various resources that allow you to assess your company’s readiness to export. These tools help you to understand what constitutes export readiness for a firm, and how your company can move toward that goal:

    Export.gov’s “Are You Export Ready?” Questionnaire - This questionnaire highlights characteristics common to successful exporters. Many of these questions will guide you into areas of the Export.gov homepage where you can obtain more information on exporting. Upon completion, you will receive a score which will help you to assess your export readiness, as well as identify areas of your business needs to strengthen to improve its export activities.

    globalEDGE Diagnostic Tool--CORE™ - This self-assessment tool allows you to determine your company's readiness to expand its operations internationally and ascertain its ability to export a particular product.

  • Submitted on 28 August 2013

    Created on August 28, 2013
     

    Discover 2013There are plenty of questions for a small business looking to start exporting. What markets are best suited for your company’s products? How can you compete with larger companies? How can you get paid for your products? What kind of research do you need to do to begin exporting?

    Luckily, you can get answers to all these questions and more at the 2013 Discover Global Forum in Raleigh, NC, Sept. 16-18.

    This two-day summit will feature some of the world’s most knowledgeable people when it comes to exporting. Trade specialists from around the globe will be on hand to share inside tips about doing business in established and emerging markets, from Africa to Asia and the Middle East to South America.

  • Submitted on 16 August 2013

    Created on August 16, 2013
     

    Departure BoardHouston’s exports have been soaring, and they will get an additional boost now that Air China, China’s flag carrier, opened up a non-stop flight route between Beijing and Houston.

    This is Air China’s first non-stop flight route to the U.S. in 30 years, and it is easy to see why Air China chose Houston—the city consistently ranks near the top of the most globally-oriented business communities in America.

    In fact, for the first time since the data has been collected, Houston became the top exporter among U.S. metropolitan areas in 2012. Houston’s goods exports totaled $110 billion, accounting for more than half of all Texas exports.

    This new flight will only help Houston exporters continue to expand to new markets.

    Behind Mexico, Canada, and Brazil, China is Houston’s fourth-largest export market, importing more than $5 billion of goods from Houston in 2012. With China’s rapid urbanization and growing middle class, demand for American-made products is likely to grow. This new flight is the next step in expanding the relationship between Houston and China.

  • Submitted on 15 August 2013

    Created on August 15, 2013
     

    Trade DataThe Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration recently released U.S. metropolitan area trade data for 2012, which shows that overall exports are up for the third consecutive year. Specifically, exports are up in 31 of the top 50 metropolitan areas, 29 of which reached record exports between 2011 and 2012. Among the top 25, Washington, DC, recorded the highest growth between 2011 and 2012, increasing exports by nearly 43 percent. Exports from San Antonio, Texas, which has an MBDA Global Business Center, grew by 33 percent during the same period.

    The Department of Commerce offers a wealth of tools and information for businesses to make choices about exporting to international markets. For example, did you know that U.S. companies sold $8 billion in transportation equipment and food products to South Korea last year? U.S. companies also exported $1.4 billion in agricultural products to Turkey.

    These are just two examples of the kind of information available through the International Trade Administration’s TradeStats Express. Here’s another. Let’s say your company sells office furniture.  Using TradeStats Express, you can very quickly determine that furniture sales to Saudi Arabia have grown 153 percent from 2007 levels and that they are currently purchasing over $140 million in furniture and fixtures from the U.S.

  • Submitted on 10 July 2013

    Created on July 10, 2013
     

    Global GrowthWhy Consider Exporting?

    • Access. Today, improvements in trade finance, the Internet, and trade agreements have dramatically increased access to markets worldwide.

    • Demand. More than 70 percent of the world’s purchasing power is located outside of the United States. Your competitors are increasing their global market share, and you can too.

    • Profitability. Exporting can be profitable for businesses of all sizes. On average, sales grow faster, more jobs are created, and employees earn more than in non-exporting firms.

    • Competitive Advantage. The United States is known throughout the world for high quality, innovative goods and services, customer service, and sound business practices.

    • Risk Mitigation. Most companies that export have an easier time riding out fluctuations in the U.S. economy and are more likely to stay in business.

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