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Export Basics


  • Submitted on 16 December 2014

    Created on December 16, 2014
     

    Don Aberle has one piece of advice for companies looking to export: Commit to it.

    It may take time, but the marketing manager from Titan Machinery Outlet says that commitment can pay off, and “good things will happen.”

    That’s the theme of a new video from the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration (ITA), which provides tips from successful exporters about how a company can become a global player.

  • Submitted on 03 December 2014

    Created on December 3, 2014
     

    Exporting Planes, Trucks, ContainersThe Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration works hard to help companies that are ready to export compete and succeed in global markets.

    We want to emphasize that it’s never too early for entrepreneurs to start thinking about exporting – determining financing needs, targeting markets, conducting research, etc.

    As we’ve worked with global startups, we’ve learned it can be difficult for entrepreneurs to connect to existing resources to help them go global. We realize that start-ups differ in their capabilities at various stages of the business development process, but want to help young businesses incorporate export plans into their business model as early as possible.

    One great way to get started is to be a part of ExporTech, which can help your company develop its export plan, then have it vetted by a panel of experts. More than 575 companies have participated in Exportech, with an average sales increase or retention of $770,000.

  • Submitted on 06 November 2014

    Created on November 6, 2014
     

    The Facts About Exporting addresses some of the misconceptions that exist and paves the way for exporting more American-made products around the world. What percentage of the world’s customers do you think live outside of the U.S.? Who exports more: small or large companies? Take a look at the infographic and learn these facts and more!

  • Submitted on 31 October 2014

    Created on October 31, 2014
     

    Starte HereWith two-thirds of the world’s purchasing power in foreign countries, exporting represents a big opportunity to tap in to new markets, expand your customer base, and grow your business.

    However, getting started with exporting can sometimes feel like a complex maze of regulations, policies, and other barriers. To help small businesses understand how to overcome these barriers and prepare to sell internationally, the federal government has several free training and educational resources that enable entrepreneurs to chart the path to exporting success. 

  • Submitted on 09 September 2014

    Created on September 9, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Kenneth R. Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando U.S. Export Assistance Center.

    With the United States continuing its focus on doing business in Africa, we are working to connect more U.S. companies with every opportunity available on the continent.

    From the recent U.S.-Africa Business Forum to the upcoming DISCOVER GLOBAL MARKETS: Sub-Saharan Africa event in Atlanta, the United States has made it a priority to support U.S. companies doing business in Africa.

    Register Now for DISCOVER: Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Submitted on 20 August 2014

    Created on August 20, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Leif Anderson recently completed an internship in the International Trade Administration’s Office for Export Policy, Promotion, and Strategy.

    AutomobileThe DISCOVER GLOBAL MARKETS: Free Trade Agreements Conference in Detroit will be a premier event for any business looking to expand exports in free trade markets.

    This is especially true for U.S. auto exporters who are looking for new opportunities in increasingly attractive free trade markets in Latin America.

    Mexico is the largest growing U.S. auto/auto parts export market in the world, with growth of $8.2 billion from 2009 to 2013 – that’s a 13 percent annual increase.

    Mexico recently passed Brazil as the top Latin American car producer, increasing demand for automobile parts from the United States.

    The DISCOVER: Free Trade Agreements forum will be a great event for U.S. auto exporters.

  • Submitted on 13 August 2014

    Created on August 13, 2014
     

    Secretary Pritzker Joins Mayor Bloomberg and President Obama at the U.S.-Africa Business ForumOriginally posted on the Commerce.gov Blog

    On August 5th, at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker highlighted a number of Commerce Department efforts to help more American businesses explore opportunities in Africa’s fast-growing markets. The Forum, focused on trade and investment opportunities on the continent, was part of President Obama’s three-day U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the largest event that any U.S. president has ever convened with African heads of state or government.

    Co-hosted by the Department of Commerce and Bloomberg Philanthropies, the U.S.-Africa Business Forum was created to encourage greater U.S. investment in Africa, foster business deals, and help create jobs on both sides of the Atlantic. During remarks at the Forum, President Obama announced that U.S. businesses have already committed to investing $14 billion in clean energy, aviation, banking, and construction projects, among other commitments totaling more than $33 billion that support economic growth in Africa and thousands of U.S. jobs.

    The Commerce Department leads the Doing Business in Africa (DBIA) campaign, which was launched in 2012 as part of the President Obama’s “U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa.” DBIA aims to increase U.S. trade promotion to Africa, address market barriers, expand the availability of trade financing, and attract more American companies to explore sub-Saharan Africa trade and investment opportunities.

  • Submitted on 13 August 2014

    Created on August 13, 2014
     

    Discover Global Markets

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    The United States is putting full focus on doing business in Africa, following President Obama’s  U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit and the U.S.-Africa Business Forum. Business Forum co-hosts Bloomberg.org and the Department of Commerce project the event will catalyze $14 billion in new business deals.

    Even though the Forum is now behind us, there are still plenty of new opportunities available in Africa, and the International Trade Administration wants to help you find them.

    The new Doing Business in Africa portal is a one-stop shop for finding resources, seeing success stories, and learning about opportunities on the continent.

    The upcoming DISCOVER GLOBAL MARKETS: Sub-Saharan Africa event in Atlanta, Nov. 5-6, will bring together private and public sector experts to discuss:

  • Submitted on 21 July 2014

    Created on July 2, 2014
     

    Satellites - Export Control ReformSmall businesses are growing at unprecedented rates. They employ about half – 55 million – of the nation’s private workforce and account for 99.7% percent of all employers in the U.S. Through exporting, they have the opportunity to grow even more: two-thirds of the world’s purchasing power is in foreign countries. In a 2013 survey of 500 small business owners, the National Small Business Association (NSBA) found that 63% of participants who did not already export said that they would be interested in doing so, but cited lack of information on exporting as an obstacle for small businesses.

    In 2009, President Obama launched the Export Control Reform (ECR) initiative, a significant effort aimed at enhancing our national and economic security through reform of the export control system—a system that had not been comprehensively updated in decades. The Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) administers export controls for commercial and some military commodities and technologies. Now, the President’s ECR initiative is transferring tens of thousands of less sensitive military items from the State Department’s jurisdiction to the more flexible Commerce regulations. Most are parts and components; many are manufactured by small businesses. Moving these items to Commerce benefits small businesses because BIS’s regulations allow for more nuanced distinctions among technologies, destinations, and end users than the State Department’s regulations.

  • Submitted on 23 June 2014

    Created on June 23, 2014
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Kenneth R. Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Orlando U.S. Export Assistance Center.

    Relying on export data can make your international business ventures more profitable.

    Numbers can be misleading, especially when they’re used as a proxy for quality thought in decision making.

    Now, let’s be clear, here. When I say that numbers can be misleading, I’m assuming that you’re looking at an X and a Y axis with data points and no text except that which is necessary to label the graph. Alternatively, you’re looking at 10 numbers: five years and five corresponding dollar amounts or volumes. That’s where a lot of U.S. exporters begin their market research; and, if that’s where their research ends, that’s a problem.

    Potential exporters need to look behind the data points on the graph by asking some important questions:

    • What happened before the trend?

    • What happened after the trend?

    • What caused the trend?

    • Can you compete (i.e., price, quality, terms of sale, features, post-sales support)?

    Here’s a hypothetical: Imagine for a moment that you sell building products and the data indicate a 5-year growth trend in Timbuktoo for exactly what you sell. Assume, too, that the data are two years out of date and that you don’t follow soccer. Little did you know that Timbuktoo hosted the World Cup two years ago and that, if you had more recent data, you’d see a drop in demand for building products once the stadium, exercise buildings, dormitories, and tourism infrastructure had been completed.

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Between 2002 and 2007, minority-owned firms outpaced the growth of non-minority firms in gross receipts, employment, and number of firms. Minority firms are an engine of job creation.
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