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Global Opportunities and New Markets


  • Submitted on 14 July 2015

    Created on July 14, 2015
     

    TanzaniaFollowing the recently concluded U.S.-East African Community (EAC) Commercial Dialogue, the Eastern Africa Diaspora Business Council in partnership with the Tanzania Embassy in Washington, DC will host a Trade Mission to Tanzania. This Trade Mission scheduled for August 5th -10th 2015, is designed to promote Tanzania’s sleeping giant, the agribusiness sector to U.S. Investors. This sector will play a significant role in energizing the Tanzanian economy to achieve poverty reduction through resourceful and productive processes that can accelerate economic growth, sustainable development and deeper integration of the Agribusiness sector in Tanzania through Public Private Partnership. 

    The Southern Agriculture Growth Corridor of Tanzania (SAGCOT) partners believe they can bring up to 350,000 hectares under production, creating 420,000 jobs, generating annual farming evenues of $1.2 billion, contributing to food security, and lifting more than two million people out of poverty by 2030. This Trade Mission is going to highlight opportunities of trade and investment with the U.S. under African Growth and Opportunity Act specifically by diversifying their exports as well as facilitating Tanzania's integration into the global economy. This mission will give investors a hand-on experience, with site visits, tours of key infrastructure facilities, meetings with key agencies and a round-table discussion with existing investors and top CEOs.

    The main U.S. businesses targeted for this Trade Mission include those in the Agriculture related sectors which include; financing, logistics, energy, cold storage facilities, infrastructure. Other mission highlights include an opportunity to visit a World Heritage site Ngorongoro Conservation area (also home of the Big 5) as well as a meeting with the East Africa Community Secretariat in Arusha, Tanzania.

  • Submitted on 13 July 2015

    Created on July 13, 2015
     

    Benin AmbassadorIt’s not every day when a credentialed ambassador to the United States leans over, eyes brightening, and says, “If small U.S. companies come to Africa, they will make money.  A lot of money.”

    He smiles as he savors the words a lot, as if tasting something delicious.

    But then it’s back to reality.  He’s asked about perceptions among U.S. businesspeople that much of Africa is decidedly unpalatable, unhealthy, unfriendly, and unprofitable.

    The Benin Ambassador to the United States Omar Arouna has heard it all before.  “Benin has been a stable democracy since 1990,” he explains.  “We have the same values, the same aspirations as the American people.  We see things exactly like the American people.”

    He wants more Americans to do business in Benin, a country the size of Kentucky on the coast of West Africa. Benin’s 10 million people work mostly in the service sector and in agriculture, where the main exports are cotton, pineapple, and cashews.

  • Submitted on 24 June 2015

    Created on June 24, 2015
     

    Exports: Key to Minority Business GrowthFree trade agreements make it easier and cheaper for U.S. companies to export their products and services to trading partner markets. By reducing trade barriers and creating a more stable and transparent trading and investment environment, it is easier and cheaper for U.S. companies to export their products and services to trading partner markets. Currently, the U.S. has free trade agreements with 20 countries. Last year 44 percent of U.S. goods exports went to FTA partner countries and supported 3.2 million jobs.1

    Why is this important? The U.S. has only five percent of the world’s consumers. With the remaining 95 percent living outside of the U.S., exports are vital to our economic stability and employment. The U.S. is currently negotiating a free trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, with Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam. Jobs supported by exports to these countries increased by over 500,000 since 2009.

    Minority business owners possess unique advantages in the global marketplace: superior cultural knowledge and language skills; existing family relationships that allow access to critical market intelligence; intimate knowledge of local commercial/business culture, and general comfort with operating in a global environment. As the U.S. seeks to remain globally competitive, engaging minority-owned businesses is no longer a moral or civic imperative—it is an economic necessity.2

  • Submitted on 17 June 2015

    Created on June 17, 2015
     

    Business CounselingThis post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

    Two Central American countries, Nicaragua and Guatemala, continue to open doors for American companies who are seeking out new markets. The U.S. Commercial Service, the trade promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, helps U.S. companies get started in exporting and increase their sales to new markets around the world. Recently, the U.S. Commercial Service office worked with two companies, Second Frontiers and Battery Concepts, helping them expand sales and services into these important Central American countries.

    Second Frontiers, a global technology consulting firm specializing in the electronic equipment industry, announced their intentions to expand services to new markets and trade partners. In August of 2014, with the assistance of the Denver, Colorado U.S. Commercial Service office, Second Frontiers used the unique business match-making services that are part of the Gold Key Service program to travel to five Central American countries, including Nicaragua and Guatemala, to meet with prospective trade partners in their industry sector. The Gold Key program provides American firms of all sizes with customized, prescreened meetings with potential overseas clients. As a result of these meetings and expanded trade opportunities, Second Frontiers is now exploring the possibility of building additional office space, warehousing, and distribution centers in the U.S. The progress of their partnerships in foreign markets has been a major catalyst for Second Frontiers domestic growth and increased sales.

  • Submitted on 04 June 2015

    Created on June 4, 2015
     

    Afrca OpportunitySub-Saharan Africa is one of the fastest developing regions in the world with an average GDP growth of 5.2 percent.  According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, almost 31,000 U.S. businesses exported to the African continent in 2013, of which approximately 92 percent were small- and medium-sized businesses (SMEs).

    Based on growth trends and a history of successful partnerships across the continent, the Sub-Saharan Africa region remains a priority for USTDA and will be highlighted during the month of June on Facebook and Twitter. USTDA will utilize social media to promote its programs, activities and potential U.S. export opportunities across the region.

  • Submitted on 04 June 2015

    Created on June 4, 2015
     

    This post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    U.S. Commercial Service Trade Winds - Africa

    Africa is a huge potential market for almost any U.S. exporter, but there are several factors for any business to consider before exporting to the continent:

  • Submitted on 02 June 2015

    Created on June 2, 2015
     

    BEA New Data ToolA new data tool--International Trade and Investment Country Facts Application--on the Bureau of Economic Analysis website gives users a snapshot of statistics on trade and investment between the United States and another country by simply clicking on a world map.

    These fast facts at your fingertips can include:

    • Total exports, imports and trade balance between the United States and the country you select.
    • The top five categories of goods and services the United States buys from and sells to that country.
    • Country level data on U.S. direct investment abroad and foreign direct investment in the United States and on the activities of multinational enterprises such as employment and sales.
  • Submitted on 22 May 2015

    Created on May 22, 2015
     

    A Basic Guide to Exorting CoverThis post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    For more than 75 years, A Basic Guide to Exporting has helped U.S. companies make their first international sale and grow their businesses through exporting. Now, with an 11th edition, you may ask, what’s different? I’ll give you a few examples.

    In this new edition, there is expanded information on cross-border e-commerce and export controls, as well as a new chapter on rules of origin in Free Trade Agreements. This edition also provides updated content on creating export plans to strategically start or increase export sales. Good news for the many small- and medium-sized businesses who might be “winging” their current export sales.

    Additionally, A Basic Guide to Exporting features all new case studies including “micro multinationals,” which are small U.S. companies that sell to buyers in 30 or more countries. For example, Chapter 3 profiles Pennsylvania-based Zeigler Bros., Inc., a firm that researches and develops foods for animal and aquatic diets. The company made an early strategic decision to boost its bottom line by doing business overseas and has never looked back. Today, Zeigler supplies 300 different products to 50 countries, with exports accounting for more than 50 percent of overall sales. In Chapter 3, the guide describes how International Sales Manager Chris Stock overcame the challenges the company faced when trying to sell internationally, including helping customers deal with localized issues such as diseases that affect fish species being farmed, finding reputable partners, and gaining an understanding of environmental regulations in the countries where the firm does business.

  • Submitted on 21 May 2015

    Created on May 21, 2015
     

    Dates: May 31 - June 10, 2015
    Locations: Miami, FL; Houston, TX; and Los Angeles, CA

    This visit is designed to introduce delegates from Colombia and Peru to U.S. green port technologies and U.S. best practices for environmental management at port operations. The delegates will have the opportunity to learn about green port programs related to energy efficiency, pollution prevention, waste reduction, and resource conversation.

    The visit will include an Industry Roundtable in Houston, Texas on June 5, where U.S. companies can learn about upcoming opportunities in Colombia and the Peru and can meet with senior-level delegates.

  • Submitted on 19 May 2015

    Created on May 19, 2015
     

    A Basic Guide to ExportingThis post originally appeared on the Tradeology, the ITA Blog

    Since May is World Trade Month, it’s only fitting that the U.S. Department of Commerce reiterate its commitment to helping companies—especially small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) —that are interested in exporting. Earlier today, we released the 11th edition of ‘A Basic Guide to Exporting’ which will help businesses navigate the avenues of trade.

    U.S. companies, particularly SMEs that are new to exporting, as well as those looking to expand their current export sales, will find this fully revised and expanded publication an invaluable tool. With 96 percent of the world’s consumers outside of the United States, exporting holds excellent opportunities for U.S. businesses to expand market share, build competitiveness, and add to their bottom lines.

    For many businesses, the export process can seem overwhelming and too difficult to pursue. This book dispels the myths that exporters need to be big, or that exporting needs to be complicated, making exporting more viable than ever for even the smallest businesses. In A Basic Guide to Exporting, first-time exporters will find information on topics including:

 

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