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Global Opportunities and New Markets


  • Submitted on 22 August 2012

    David Hinson, National Director

    I am sitting with Luciana Mello, an Afro-Brazilian entrepreneur whose consulting company, Prama Consulting, assists small and medium-sized businesses export from Brazil. One of her main lines of business is language translation services. As businesses continue to move to a global economy, there is a growing need for translation services.

    Most of Mello’s clients are Afro-Brazilian companies that export primarily within Latin America. When asked about exporting to the U.S., Luciana said “Most of my clients don't consider exporting to the United States because they feel that the market is too difficult to enter and too large, but if they could find a U.S. partner, they would be interested.”

  • Submitted on 22 August 2012

    The flags of the United States and Brazil. MBDA National Director Hinson and Shawn Ricks, Senior Advisor to the National Director on Global Affairs began a five-day trip to Brasilia and Sao Paulo, Brazil. This trip will provide an opportunity for MBDA to build relationships with key stakeholder groups essential to reaching its export targets under the National Export Initiative, create greater access to emerging markets for minority business enterprises, and support job creation in the United States.

    On Monday, Director Hinson and Senior Advisor Ricks met with International Trade Administration Senior Commercial Officer Brian Brisson and his team to discuss business opportunities for minority-owned businesses in Brazil. As Latin America’s biggest economy, Brazil has strong domestic demands and a growing middle class. Its diversified economy offers U.S. companies, especially minority-owned – who are nearly twice as likely to export as non-minority owned business, many opportunities to export their goods and services.

  • Submitted on 07 August 2012

    This fiscal year for the first time, the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) has set an all-time single-year record of more than $500 million in export financing for minority-owned and woman-owned businesses in the United States. The Bank’s financing has supported more than 400 transactions and an estimated 7,000 American jobs across the country.

    Ex-Im Bank employs a business-development team devoted exclusively to assisting minority-owned and woman-owned businesses. The team provides resources on how to access global markets and use Ex-Im’s export financing to break into or expand export sales.

  • Submitted on 07 August 2012

    Sub-Saharan Africa is a continent of opportunities for U.S. businesses with overall projected growth rates of approximately six percent in 2012 – some of the highest in the world. In looking at the world’s ten fastest growing economies from 2001 – 2010, six were in Africa. This trend accelerates in 2011-2015 with seven of the ten world’s fastest growing economies being in Africa. In the World Bank’s Doing Business 2012: Doing Business in a More Transparent World an impressive 36 out of 46 economies in Sub-Saharan Africa improved business regulations this year – a record number since 2005. Of the economies that improved the most in the ease of doing business in 2010/2011, with improvements in three or more areas of regulation measured by Doing Business, four of the twelve are Sub-Saharan African countries.

  • Submitted on 27 July 2012

    US-Colombia FTA will increase opportunities for American exporters and create American jobs

    US Colombia FlagsThis summer, the United States Department of Commerce, in conjunction with the State Department, held a webinar that outlined the US-Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and explained what this historical agreement would mean to businesses in the United States.

    Over 200 businesses registered for this webinar and had the opportunity to have their questions answered directly by the Ambassador to Colombia Michael McKinley, National Deputy Director of the Minority Business Development Agency, Alejandra Y. Castillo, and Michael Masserman, Executive Director for Export Policy, Promotion and Strategy at the International Trade Association. To help advance President Obama’s National Export Initiative, the presenters educated export-ready business owners about the potential of the U.S.–Colombia  Free Trade Agreement.  This Free Trade Agreement has massive potential for American business, as this new agreement could increase U.S. exports by $1.1 billion.

    Why should American businesses (especially small ones!) care about exporting? Because through exports a company of any size can increase their sales, enter previously untapped markets, and strengthen the financial stability of their company. Most importantly, exporting is one of the key methods for putting Americans back to work. This is especially true for minority-owned businesses that are exploring other ways to employ American workers. Minority-owned businesses have a competitive advantage in global trade based on their cultural ties, language skills and nimbleness. 

    The 2007 Survey of Business Owners reveals that among firms with export sales representing 20 percent or more of their overall receipts, minority-owned businesses are twice as likely to export compared to non-minority firms. In addition, minority firms are more than three times as likely to have businesses generating 100 percent of all their sales in exports compared to non-minority respondent firms. This finding is quite substantial because it supports the Administration’s goal to double the nation’s exports by the end of 2014.

  • Submitted on 29 June 2012

    For minority business owners interested in exporting their goods and services and eager to make contacts with markets overseas, but unable to travel, reverse trade missions provide unique opportunities to foster business relationships and build long-lasting partnerships between U.S. businesses and our overseas partners.

  • Submitted on 20 June 2012

    Ninety-six percent of the world’s consumers live outside of the United States and represent two-thirds of the world’s purchasing power. U.S. companies that export enjoy business success with increased sales and profit potential. Exporting also helps businesses weather downturns in the domestic economy by being prepared to respond to foreign competition and global market trends.

  • Submitted on 23 May 2012

    Indonesia is Southeast Asia’s largest economy and while Indonesia’s annual growth slowed down to 4.5% in 2009, it expanded to 6.1% in 2010. Some economists predict that Indonesia’s economic growth may reach 8% in 2011. During the difficult global conditions of 2009, Indonesia’s economy was among the top worldwide performers. Stock market valuation was up 87% in 2009 and 46% in 2010 and from 2000 until 2010, Indonesia’s average annual GDP growth was 5.17% with a stable currency and improved sovereign credit status.

    The consumer market continues to grow in the world’s fourth-largest country. There are more than 237 million citizens, 50% of whom are under the age of 30. GDP per person exceeds its Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) neighbors such the Philippines and Indonesia has a GDP per person three times that of Vietnam. Indonesia is a thriving democracy with significant regional autonomy. It is located on the world’s major trade routes and has extensive natural resources. It is a top-ten market for U.S. agricultural products and within the top 30 overall markets for U.S. exports. Indonesia has ratified the Cape Town Treaty, which gives U.S. aircraft exporters access to financing through international protection and registration of financial interests.

  • Submitted on 21 May 2012

    It’s that time of year again.

    May is World Trade Month, a time to reaffirm the important role that international trade plays in U.S. economic growth.

    In today’s global economy, it is more important than ever for American businesses to tap into the abundance of opportunities overseas.  95 percent of the world’s consumers are located outside our borders; helping companies reach them is key to our nation’s economic success and future.   

  • Submitted on 21 May 2012

    Colombia Trade Agreement Now in Force!Today more than 80 percent of U.S. exports of consumer and industrial products to Colombia become duty-free as part of the U.S.-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement. This includes agricultural and construction equipment, building products, aircraft and parts, fertilizers, information technology equipment, medical scientific equipment and wood. Also, more than half of U.S. exports of agricultural commodities to Colombia become duty-free, including wheat, barley, soybeans, high-quality beef, bacon and almost all fruit and vegetable products.

    The agreement also provides significant new access to Colombia’s $180 billion services market, supporting increased opportunities for U.S. service providers. For example, Colombia agreed to eliminate measures that prevented firms from hiring U.S. professionals, and to phase-out market restrictions in cable television.

    Prior to the enactment of this agreement, the average tariff that U.S. manufactured goods faced entering Colombia was 10.8 percent. With entry into force today, Colombia’s average tariff rate for manufactured goods from the United States has been reduced to 4 percent.

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The percentage of clients with annual revenues in excess of $500,000 increased over the last five fiscal years.
Graph for MBDA Client Portfolio made up by SGI Clients

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