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Established Businesses and Growth


  • Submitted on 05 March 2012

    Central Contractor Registration (CCR) is the official, free on-line registrant database for the U.S. Federal Government. CCR collects, validates, stores and disseminates data in support of agency acquisition and award missions.

    Purpose: Client Resource, Marketing Businesses

    Who should register in CCR?

    • Current and potential vendors must be registered in CCR prior to an award or contract, basic agreement, basic ordering, or blanket purchase agreement [See FAR 4.11]
    • Private non-profits, educational organizations, state and regional agencies that apply for assistance awards via grants.gov must now register with CCR
    • A foreign company that performs work outside the US is required to register in the CCR system in order to be awarded a contract [See FAR 4.1102(a)(5)]
    • Exceptions are reserved for classified contracts (see 2.101) or contracts to support unusual or compelling needs

    What is required to register?

  • Submitted on 29 February 2012

    Metal WorkThe “Made in America” brand remains strong, with a growing number of businesses bringing production and jobs back to the U.S. from overseas.

    Recent studies indicate on-shoring is likely to increase over the next several years due to rising transportation costs and as companies take advantage of America’s high workforce productivity and strong quality control.

    Do You Plan to Bring Production Home? The U.S. Small Business Administration’s International Trade Loan (ITL) Program Can Help!

    The U.S. Small Business Administration’s ITL program provides small businesses with capital to finance their fixed assets, including real estate, and working capital needs. This program offers private lenders a 90% guarantee on loans as an incentive to encourage lending to growing small businesses.

  • Submitted on 29 February 2012

    The SBA also issued a proposed rule to increase the small business size standards for 28 industries in the Health Care and Social Assistance sector.   As many as 4,100 additional firms could become eligible for SBA’s programs and services if the proposed increases are adopted. 

    Comments can be submitted on this proposed rule on or before April 24, 2012, at Regulations.gov, identified by RIN 3245-AG30, where they will be posted.  You may also mail comments to Khem R. Sharma, Chief, Size Standards Division, 409 3rd St., SW, Mail Code 6530, Washington, DC  20416.

  • Submitted on 17 February 2012

    Green CheckmarksGreen dry cleaners, Green energy. Green puppy food. Green car washes. Green wall paints. Green grease removal.

    Green: it’s everywhere.  It’s taught in the first grade.  It’s at the center of many corporate manufacturing and marketing policies. And whether you believe in climate change or still have doubts, consumers are now demanding GREEN.

    Adopting environmentally friendly and energy efficient business practices provides numerous benefits to new and existing small business owners looking to control costs, attract customers and become socially responsible. Non-toxic, recycled, organic, energy efficient, reused, eco-friendly, farm-to-table: these terms, and others, all help define the fast-growing green market. 

    So what can you do as a small business?  Remember, that regardless of what options you choose, each one of them should and must be connected to your marketing strategy and company messaging.  If you adopt energy efficiency practices, let your customers know; if you are committed to local agriculture, let them know, and if your product contains recycled by-products, let them know.  Four out of five consumers say they are still buying environmentally friendly products and services today – which sometimes cost more – even in the midst of a recovering economy.

  • Submitted on 14 February 2012

    Marketing Plan“Before beginning, plan carefully.” 

    The philosophy of the great Roman Orator Cicero is just as appropriate in today’s small business environment as it was in the political arena of the Roman Empire.  A sound and well thought-out marketing plan is an essential part of a firm’s ability to compete in today’s marketplace.  In spite of this, many small businesses take a disorganized or haphazard approach to their marketing efforts and, as a result, fail to capitalize on opportunities to sell more of their products and services. 

    Why do so many take this half-hearted approach?   Many believe it stems from the nature of the entrepreneur, who thrives on action and being intrinsically involved in the day-to-day operations of the business.  Planning is seen as a non-active effort and therefore does not provide the same stimulus as being involved in producing and selling a product and/or service.

    The process of creating a marketing plan involves three steps:

    1. An analysis of the firm’s internal and external environments;

    2. A decision on a “Unique Selling Point” to emphasize and project; and

    3. The selection of action plans (both paid and unpaid) to reach the targeted customer base.

  • Submitted on 13 February 2012

    The U.S. Small Business Administration published a final rule in The Federal Register that will increase some of the size definitions of small businesses in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services and Other Services sectors.

    The final rule will increase 37 of the revenue-based size standards in 34 industries and three sub-industries in the “Professional, Scientific and Technical Services” sector.  It will also increase one size standard in the “Other Services” sector.

  • Submitted on 23 January 2012

    EmployeesEmployer Identification Number (EIN)

    An EIN is also known as a federal tax identification number, and is used to identify a business entity. Employers with employees, business partnerships, and corporations and other types of organizations, must obtain an EIN from the IRS. The EIN is also known as an Employer Tax ID and Form SS-4.

    You are required to have an EIN if you answer “yes” to any of the following six questions:

    1. Do you have employees?

    2. Do you operate your business as either a corporation or partnership?

    3. Do you file any of these tax returns: employment, excise, or alcohol, tobacco and firearms?

    4. Do you withhold taxes on income, other than wages, paid to a non-resident alien?

    5. Do you have a Keogh plan?

    6. Are you involved with any of the following types of organizations?

  • Submitted on 09 January 2012

    Native American entrepreneurs have a new tool to help determine if they’re ready for business ownership and to help them get started.  Native American Small Business Primer: Strategies for Success is a free, self-paced online business course developed for Native American business owners.  The course provides an overview of basic business principles and  makes them aware of the programs and services available from the U.S. Small Business Administration.

    “Native American Small Business Primer: Strategies for Success will enhance the agency’s effort to provide important resources for emerging Native American entrepreneurs,” said SBA Administrator Karen Mills.  “Our ultimate goal is to help create jobs and stimulate economic and business development in our Native American communities. This course is an essential business development tool for the entrepreneur’s toolbox.”

    The new online course: emphasizes business planning and market research as essential steps to take before going into business; informs Native American entrepreneurs about the legal aspects of starting a business, including the type of ownership (legal structure) and licensing; and provides key information on seed money for starting up, raising capital, and borrowing money.  In addition, there is a section on how to estimate business start-up costs that can help assess the financial needs of going into business.

  • Submitted on 04 January 2012

    Record KeepingEveryone in business must keep records.  Keeping good records is very important to your business.  Good records will help you do the following:

    • Monitor the progress of your business
    • Prepare your financial statements
    • Identify source of receipts
    • Keep track of deductible expenses
    • Prepare your tax returns
    • Support items reported on tax returns

    Monitor the progress of your business

    You need good records to monitor the progress of your business. Records can show whether your business is improving, which items are selling, or what changes you need to make.  Good records can increase the likelihood of business success.

  • Submitted on 04 January 2012

    Business ExpensesBusiness expenses are the cost of carrying on a trade or business. These expenses are usually deductible if the business is operated to make a profit.

    To be deductible, a business expense must be both ordinary and necessary. An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your trade or business. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for your trade or business. An expense does not have to be indispensable to be considered necessary.

Did you know...

Between 2002 and 2007, minority-owned firms outpaced the growth of non-minority firms in gross receipts, employment, and number of firms. Minority firms are an engine of job creation.
Graph for MBE Growth

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